The Spice must flow.

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Frank Herbert's Dune

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Some have taken issue with Alec Newman's portrayal of the [[Paul Atreides]] character (particularly in the first part of the film), as an angst-filled, rebellious, petulant teenager, which they consider a contradiction with his portrayal as a mature-beyond-his-years protagonist in Herbert's novel. However, others believe that in the miniseries, Newman's conflicted portrayal is more realistic.
 
Some have taken issue with Alec Newman's portrayal of the [[Paul Atreides]] character (particularly in the first part of the film), as an angst-filled, rebellious, petulant teenager, which they consider a contradiction with his portrayal as a mature-beyond-his-years protagonist in Herbert's novel. However, others believe that in the miniseries, Newman's conflicted portrayal is more realistic.
   
Paul would also rub his right temple when frustrated, a trait shared by the [[Baron Harkonnen]], a subtle but effective foreshadowing to their relation.
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Paul would also rub his right temple when frustrated, a trait shared by the Baron Harkonnen, a subtle but effective foreshadowing to their relation.
   
 
The miniseries also boasted some stylistic changes. For example, whereas Herbert's ornithopters were described as truly birdlike in their flight, the miniseries' ornithopters more closely resembled insects. Contention surrounding the 'correct' pronunciation of Herbert's character names such as "Harkonnen", "Chani", and "Fedaykin" aside, the miniseries opted for a Western pronunciation ("Fed-die-kin") as opposed to the [[Wikipedia:Arabic language|Arabic]]-sounding one used in Lynch's film (which would seem appropriate given the extensive, Arabic-themed terminology in the novel). The miniseries also decided, for unknown reasons, to pronounce the Harkonnen name with the emphasis on the first syllable instead of the second. Chani's name was pronounced with a hard "a" instead of the soft "a" used in the Lynch film. Some fans were upset by the look of the [[spice melange|spice]]-addicted characters' eyes, believing that the phosphorescent light blue coloring was not consistent with Herbert's description, "blue within blue".
 
The miniseries also boasted some stylistic changes. For example, whereas Herbert's ornithopters were described as truly birdlike in their flight, the miniseries' ornithopters more closely resembled insects. Contention surrounding the 'correct' pronunciation of Herbert's character names such as "Harkonnen", "Chani", and "Fedaykin" aside, the miniseries opted for a Western pronunciation ("Fed-die-kin") as opposed to the [[Wikipedia:Arabic language|Arabic]]-sounding one used in Lynch's film (which would seem appropriate given the extensive, Arabic-themed terminology in the novel). The miniseries also decided, for unknown reasons, to pronounce the Harkonnen name with the emphasis on the first syllable instead of the second. Chani's name was pronounced with a hard "a" instead of the soft "a" used in the Lynch film. Some fans were upset by the look of the [[spice melange|spice]]-addicted characters' eyes, believing that the phosphorescent light blue coloring was not consistent with Herbert's description, "blue within blue".
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